FAQ

Want to know more about everything from climate change to animal welfare?

Read our frequently asked questions to find the answers.

 

If you come across any injured wildlife (such as gazelles), stranded marine life (such as turtles or dugongs) or any other environmental emergencies call the Abu Dhabi Government Contact Centre: 800555 or contact our Customer Happiness team during working hours.

 

Tel: +971 2 693 4444

E-mail: customerhappiness@ead.gov.ae

Working hours: 7:30 AM – 3:00 PM

 

 

If you come across any stray injured animals (such as cats or dogs) contact the Abu Dhabi Falcon Hospital’s Abu Dhabi Animal Shelter . 

 

 

We have a wide range of free downloadable environmental resources and materials on our website. If you can’t find the information you are looking for, contact our Customer Happiness team on customerhappiness@ead.gov.ae

 

 

We conduct regular environmental education training for teachers. If you are interested in receiving training, please enourage your school to register for our Sustainable Schools Initiative or our Sustainable Campus Initiative.

For more information about our educational programmes, please click here


If you are looking for any information regarding the environment in Abu Dhabi Emirate, our website offers a wealth of free downloadable resources and materials.

 

 

We offer a wide range of volunteering opportunities from clean-ups to helping us with our daily work at our HQ.

 

Follow us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook to stay updated on the latest environmental volunteering opportunities.

 

We also offer volunteering opportunities through universities based in Abu Dhabi Emirate. To know more, e-mail customerhappiness@ead.gov.ae.

 

 

To apply for a job at EAD and to know more about our vacancies, click here!

 

 

We offer internships to Emiratis through universities based in Abu Dhabi Emirate. To know more, e-mail customerhappiness@ead.gov.ae

 

 

To buy any of our publications, contact our Customer Happiness team on customerhappiness@ead.gov.ae

Click here to see our publications for sale.

 

 

 

Abu Dhabi is teeming with terrestrial, marine, animal and plant life. It is home to mountains, expanses of desert, plains, wadis and one of the world’s only complete coastal salt flats (sabkha).

 

To know more about where to visit to appreciate and experience this biodiversity, click here.

 

 

To learn more about Abu Dhabi’s diverse biodiversity, click here!

 

 

 

The coastline of Abu Dhabi accounts for more than 75% of the UAE’s entire coastal territory.

 

While our marine water quality is generally excellent, it is important to maintain it at that level for public health, fisheries, aquaculture, tourism and recreation. We monitor the marine water quality conditions at 22 sites that include ecologically-important areas in and near Abu Dhabi City, as well as in the Al Dhafra Region in order to detect the effects of human activities on habitat degradation and water-dependent resources.

 

 

When it comes to ensuring high marine water quality, the primary concerns are sediment concentrations of industrial pollutants and nutrient over-enrichment, which can lead to excessive algal growth.

 

This can disrupt water desalination operations - causing fish kills, and adversely affecting recreational use of marine water. Other risks include discharge of untreated sewage, brine from desalination plants or treated sewage effluent.

 

 

It's easy to get involved in protecting marine water quality in Abu Dhabi. EAD holds frequent beach clean-ups open to the public, which are a great way to get involved and make a difference.

 

If you are going on a beach or boat trip, always make sure to bring back your waste and dispose of it carefully, so nothing goes into the sea. ​And of course, if you spot anything strange or unusual on the beach or in the sea, report it to the EAD Emergency Team by calling the Abu Dhabi Government Contact Center on 800 555. 

 

 

 

Climate change refers to changes in the Earth's global climate or in regional climate over time. Burning of fossil fuels to meet our energy needs has contributed to high levels of carbon emissions in the air, causing the global temperatures to rise. The UAE's per capita carbon emission is among the highest in the world.

 

 

Climate change is expected to enhance extreme weather conditions, impact availability of water, reduce our forest cover and impact our ecosystems and biodiversity.

 

Sensitive habitats such as the mangroves, seagrass and corals face threat with rising sea levels. Fragile plants and organisms living in the desert dry lands can be endangered by even a slight increase in temperatures.

 

However, the sea level rising is perhaps one of the gravest risks that the UAE faces with 85% of its population and 90% of infrastructure located along the coast.

 

 

Start by calculating your own carbon footprint using one of the numerous online tools out there such as www.carbonfootprint.com . Then, take steps to reduce your energy and water consumption and waste production to protect the environment.

 

This can also be achieved by buying local and seasonal products, especially foodstuffs, to reduce the emissions generated by long distance transportation​.

 

 

 

An increasing population and high-consuming society are contributing to a growing level of waste in Abu Dhabi.

 

According to 2017 statistics, an estimated 9.66 million tonnes of total solid waste is generated annually in Abu Dhabi.

 

EAD's waste management work is the response to this challenge - whether it's putting in place strong laws to ensure commercial entities dispose of their waste responsibly, managing the recycling process or diverting waste from landfill, this is all part of the area.

 

 

Abu Dhabi Environment Vision 2030 sets out plans to reduce waste while increase recyling and diversion from landfills.

 

To achieve this goal, EAD works in collaboration with Tadweer to reinforce sustainable waste management across Abu Dhabi.

 

This work includes creating a strong regulatory framework with the implementation of waste planning policy, waste classification policy and a technical guide for waste classification, as well as an integrated management approach and penalties for those who do not follow the rules. 

 

 

First, it’s important to remember the importance of reducing your consumption and reducing your use of paper and plastic  as much as possible.

 

If you are interested in recycling, visit www.tadweer.ae  to select and contact one of the more than 900 Environmental Service Providers that are certified by Tadweer (formerly known as the Centre for Waste Management – Abu Dhabi).

 

These service providers are categorised according to the type of waste they collect or recycle such as paper or plastic. Hazardous as well as construction and demolition waste has to be correctly transported, treated and disposed of. Even small volumes of waste from dental surgeries and medical clinics can be significant. 

 

 

First, it’s important to remember the importance of reducing your consumption and reducing your use of paper and plastic as much as possible first, before considering recycling.

 

If you are interested in recycling, visit www.tadweer.ae to select and contact one of the more than 900 certified Environmental Service Providers. 

 

If you have unwanted goods such as clothes, books, toys and household items, consider donating them to Emirates Red Crescent at one of these locations.

 

You can also recycle other materials like plastic, paper, glass, bottles, mobiles electronics, cardboards, discarded food items and cans in a recycling center beside Khalidiya Park.

 

 

If you have large unwanted quantities of untouched food, give Saving Grace (Hefth Al Ne’ma), an arm of the Emirates Red Crescent, a call on 800 5011. They collect and distribute the food from around the country to the most needy.

 

 

 

Plastic is made from primary petrochemicals derived from petroleum.

 

Plastic bags are made from polyethylene, which is one of the polymers or refined compounds that consist of long chains of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen that react together to make plastic bags. Such materials take hundreds of years to leave our environment.

 

 

Plastics are considered one of the most hazardous industrial substances affecting human health and the environment.

 

Their real danger lies in being resistant to microbial degradation as well as containing dioxin compounds which can cause cancer. Incorrect disposal of plastic, either by burning or burying it, greatly affects the environment.

 

 

Due to their light weight, plastic bags can easily fly to distant places and accumulate in channels and drains.

 

Meanwhile, plastic bags in our seas and oceans could cover coral reefs and prevent them from receiving the sun's rays and the renewable water currents that carry food and oxygen.

 

Turtles can eat plastic bags thinking they are jellyfish, which leads to their suffocation and death.

 

Plastic bags can also block the digestive canals of some animals, such as camels, goats and gazelles. Each year, thousands of birds die due to plastic bags.

 

 

There are plenty of alternatives to using plastic bags.

 

For example, by replacing them with fabric alternatives or using pots and bottles made of glass. We should all co-operate to solve the plastic problem – as the future is truly in our hands.

 

 

Single-use plastics are considered one of the most hazardous industrial substances affecting human health and the environment.

 

Their real danger lies in being resistant to microbial degradation as well as containing dioxin compounds, which can cause cancer. Incorrect disposal of plastic, either by burning or burying it, greatly affects the environment.

 

 

Due to their light weight, plastic bags can easily fly to distant places and accumulate in channels and drains.

 

Meanwhile, plastic bags in our seas and oceans could cover coral reefs and prevent them from receiving the sun's rays and the renewable water currents that carry food and oxygen.

 

Turtles can eat plastic bags thinking they are jellyfish, which leads to their suffocation and death. Plastic bags can also block the digestive canals of some animals, such as camels, goats and gazelles.

 

 

There are plenty of alternatives to using single-use plastics. For example, replacing plastic bags with fabric alternatives, carrying your own re-usable bottle and mugs and saying no to plastic utensils and straws.

 

 

 

Outdoor air pollution is the primary environmental threat to public health in the UAE.

 

At the EAD, we work to protect air quality and consider the control of noise pollution to be part of this remit.

 

Abu Dhabi occasionally experiences high concentrations of particulate matter and ground-level ozone. Dust storms exacerbate this problem greatly, with particulate matter in the atmosphere up to 14 times higher than WHO (World Health Organisation) standards.

 

 

The scientific studies analyse the levels and sources of sulphur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxide (NOX), carbon monoxide (CO), particulate matter (PM10andPM2.5) and non-methane volatile organic compounds(NMVOCs)emitted in the Emirate. These found that energy, road transport and industrial sectors are the biggest contributors to air pollution in the Emirate.

 

How do we know what is happening with air pollution locally?


EAD operates a network of 20 air quality monitoring stations spread out around Abu Dhabi Emirates.

 

To help you understand how air quality is measured, how it can affect your health and how to combat its effects visit the Air Quality Index visit www.adairquality.ae 

 

 

Last year the EAD, after detailed research and collaboration with over 90 local industrial and government partners, published Abu Dhabi’s First Comprehensive Air Emission Maps.

 

They found that energy, road transport and industrial sectors are the biggest contributors to air pollution in the Emirate. We will use these maps to deliver targeted policy responses. 

 

 

The main challenge with Abu Dhabi’s air quality has always been the desert nature of the Emirate and the repeated sand storms we experience during certain seasons of the year.

 

All other pollutants that we monitor are within global standards. When these dust storms occur, they can trigger respiratory distress from asthmatic attacks or reactive airway disease, particularly if one is not prepared in advance.

 

This is particularly relevant for populations at risk, including children, the elderly, and those who are ill.

 

We have been monitoring and assessing air quality since 2007 through an extensive network of 20 stationary and 2 mobile stations set up across the Emirate.

 

This data, collected on a minute-by-minute basis, has helped us to have an accurate and comprehensive understanding of air quality in Abu Dhabi, has helped us determine the sources of air pollutants, which in turn has helped us develop programmes, plans and strategies to decrease pollution.

 

 

EAD operates a network of 20 stationary and 2 mobile air quality monitoring stations spread out around Abu Dhabi Emirates.

 

To help you understand how air quality is measured, how it can affect your health and how to combat its effects visit the Air Quality Index at www.adairquality.ae .

 

You can also download a free smartphone/tablet application, the Plume Air Report, which offers live air quality data to residents plumelabs.com/en/air/.